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What Are Testosterone Pellets Used For?

Treating Delayed Puberty With Testosterone Pellets

Delayed puberty occurs when a child does not undergo puberty (the period of sexual maturity) by a certain age -- around age 14 in boys and age 12 in girls. There are many possible causes of delayed puberty. In some cases, the child is just a "late bloomer" and puberty is expected to occur at a later date. In other cases, the underlying cause may be due to a medical problem that requires treatment for puberty to occur.
 
Delayed puberty can be quite troubling to an adolescent. Testosterone pellets may be used to treat delayed puberty in boys who are expected to otherwise eventually go through puberty but are not responding to psychological support. In these cases, testosterone pellets are typically used for a brief period, at a relatively low dose, just to get puberty started. Once puberty begins, the body can produce its own hormones and the pellets can be stopped.
 
Testosterone replacement therapy, including testosterone pellets, may also be used to produce male sex characteristics in adolescents who would not otherwise go through puberty due to certain medical problems. Replacement therapy may need to continue into adulthood in males whose deficiencies persist beyond puberty.
 

How Does This Medicine Work?

As mentioned, this medicine comes as a tiny pellet that contains testosterone. The pellet is inserted into the fatty layer just beneath the skin. Once there, the pellet slowly dissolves, releasing testosterone into the body for three to four months (sometimes as long as six months). As a result, testosterone blood levels increase.
 

Can Children Use Testosterone Pellets?

In certain cases, testosterone pellets may be used in boys with low testosterone levels when needed for the development of male sex characteristics or to stimulate puberty. Because this treatment may cause a problem with bone growth, bone age must be monitored every six months. Talk to your child's healthcare provider about the risks and benefits of using the pellets in children.
 
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Testosterone Pellet Information

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