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Nitroglycerin Overdose - Precautions and Warnings With Capsaicin 8% Patch

This page contains links to eMedTV Senior Health Articles containing information on subjects from Nitroglycerin Overdose to Precautions and Warnings With Capsaicin 8% Patch. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Nitroglycerin Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, people who have overdosed on nitroglycerin may develop seizures, blue skin, and dangerously low blood pressure. This page lists other potential overdose effects and describes possible treatment options.
  • Nitroglycerin Patch
    Available by prescription only, the nitroglycerin patch may help prevent chest pain. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains how the patch works to prevent angina attacks, offers general dosing information, and describes potential side effects.
  • Nitroglycerin Patch Dosage
    When preventing angina with the nitroglycerin patch, apply a patch to the skin each day for 12 to 14 hours. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for nitroglycerin patches, including important tips for how to safely use this drug.
  • Nitroglycerin Patch Information
    The nitroglycerin patch is prescribed to prevent chest pain in adults. This eMedTV Web selection offers more information on the nitroglycerin patch, including dosing tips, possible side effects, and why this patch is not suitable for some people.
  • Nitroglycerin Patch Side Effects
    Headaches, fainting, and lightheadedness are some of the common side effects of the nitroglycerin patch. This eMedTV page lists other reactions that have been seen in clinical studies, including serious problems that may require immediate medical care.
  • Nitroglycerin Precautions and Warnings
    If you have any allergies or severe anemia, let your doctor know before using nitroglycerin. This eMedTV page describes other topics to discuss with your doctor before using nitroglycerin. Warnings and safety precautions with this drug are also included.
  • Nitroglycerin Side Effects
    Some people may get a headache every time they use nitroglycerin. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers a detailed description of other possible nitroglycerin side effects and explains which ones need to be reported to your doctor right away.
  • Nitroglycerin Transdermal Patch
    This eMedTV Web resource explains that as a transdermal medicine, nitroglycerin patches should only be applied to the skin. This page provides more tips on how to safely and effectively use these skin patches. A link to more information is also included.
  • Nitroglycerin Uses
    Nitroglycerin is a drug prescribed to relieve or prevent chest pain in people with coronary heart disease. This eMedTV page describes how this angina medicine works, specific uses of the drug, and whether it is safe for children to use nitroglycerin.
  • Nitroglycerine
    Nitroglycerin is a drug prescribed to treat or prevent chest pain caused by coronary artery disease. This eMedTV page also explains how this prescription drug works and the various forms available. Nitroglycerine is a common misspelling of nitroglycerin.
  • Nitroglycerine Side Effects
    Potential nitroglycerin side effects include headaches, weakness, and a runny nose. This eMedTV page lists other possible problems that may occur with nitroglycerin. Nitroglycerine side effects is a common misspelling of nitroglycerin side effects.
  • Nitroglycern
    Nitroglycerin is a medicine licensed to treat or prevent angina in people with coronary artery disease. This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of this drug and offers a link to more information. Nitroglycern is a common misspelling of nitroglycerin.
  • Oxybutanin
    Oxybutynin is a prescription drug licensed to treat the symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV Web page further describes oxybutynin and discusses its effects and possible side effects. Oxybutanin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutin
    Oxybutynin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV Web page discusses other approved oxybutynin uses and describes the effects of the medication. Oxybutin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutinin
    Oxybutynin is a medication that can be prescribed to treat the symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of oxybutynin and lists possible side effects that may occur. Oxybutinin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutynin
    Oxybutynin is commonly prescribed to treat bladder conditions caused by nerve problems. This eMedTV article discusses specific oxybutynin uses, explains how the medication works, and offers dosing information, including when and how to take it.
  • Oxybutynin Chloride ER Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on oxybutynin chloride ER? This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this drug, including how it works to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder, common side effects, and important safety concerns.
  • Oxybutynin Chloride for Overactive Bladder
    As this eMedTV page explains, overactive bladder symptoms can be treated with oxybutynin chloride. This article talks about this prescription medicine in more detail, including other uses and a link to more information.
  • Oxybutynin Dosing
    The recommended oxybutynin dose for adults with bladder problems is 5 mg two to three times daily. This eMedTV segment also offers oxybutynin dosing guidelines for children and elderly people, and includes tips for when and how to take the drug.
  • Oxybutynin Drug Interactions
    Pramlintide, protease inhibitors, and certain antibiotics may interact with oxybutynin. This eMedTV resource lists other types of medications that may cause oxybutynin drug interactions and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Oxybutynin ER
    Oxybutynin ER is a prescription medicine licensed to treat bladder problems due to an overactive bladder. This eMedTV page describes in detail the clinical effects of this drug, explains how it works, and offers dosing guidelines and tips for taking it.
  • Oxybutynin ER Dosing
    The recommended oxybutynin ER dose for adults is 5 to 10 mg once daily. This article from the eMedTV library also includes oxybutynin ER dosing guidelines for children with bladder problems due to neurological disorders.
  • Oxybutynin Gel
    Oxybutynin gel is a medication prescribed to treat an overactive bladder. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides a more in-depth look at this product, including information on dosing information, general precautions, and potential side effects.
  • Oxybutynin Gel Dosage
    There is only one dosage of oxybutynin gel for treating an overactive bladder. This eMedTV Web resource explains that the standard dosage of this drug is one packet applied to the skin of the stomach, upper arms, shoulders, or thighs once daily.
  • Oxybutynin Gel Information
    This page on the eMedTV site provides some basic information on oxybutynin gel, a drug used to treat an overactive bladder. This segment describes where and how to apply the drug and addresses important safety concerns to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oxybutynin Side Effects
    Common side effects of oxybutynin may include abdominal pain, nausea, and insomnia. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other common side effects of the drug, as well as serious side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Pneumovax
    Pneumovax is a vaccine used to prevent pneumonia and other infections. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth overview of this product, with information on how it works, how to get vaccinated, possible side effects, and more.
  • Pneumovax and Breastfeeding
    Like most vaccines, Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) is considered safe for nursing women. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on breastfeeding and Pneumovax, including what the Centers for Disease Control recommends.
  • Pneumovax and Pregnancy
    Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) may be given to women who are expecting. This eMedTV selection discusses the safety issues surrounding Pneumovax and pregnancy, explaining why a healthcare provider may recommend it for a pregnant woman.
  • Pneumovax Dosage
    Pneumovax is typically given as a single dose. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, a second injection may be necessary in some cases. This article discusses the dosing guidelines for Pneumovax in more detail, including tips on timing your dosage.
  • Pneumovax Drug Interactions
    Anticoagulants such as warfarin or heparin can react negatively with Pneumovax. This eMedTV article tells you what you need to know about Pneumovax drug interactions, including a detailed list of medicines that can interfere with this vaccine.
  • Pneumovax Side Effects
    Redness and pain at the injection site are some of the common side effects seen with Pneumovax. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at the problems that can occur with this vaccine, including side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Pneumovax Uses
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, Pneumovax can help prevent pneumonia and certain other conditions. This page takes a closer look what Pneumovax is used for, including an explanation of how the vaccine works.
  • Pneumovax Vaccination
    An injected vaccination, Pneumovax is used to prevent pneumonia, bacteremia, and other conditions. This eMedTV article briefly describes the vaccine, including a discussion on the age groups it is approved for. A link to more information is also included.
  • Pneumovax Vaccine Information
    Pneumovax is used to protect against pneumonia and other pneumococcal diseases. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Pneumovax, including a discussion of the vaccine's side effects, dosing guidelines, and generic availability.
  • Pneumovax Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV article explains, it's usually a good idea to postpone your Pneumovax injection if you are moderately to severely ill. This page provides several Pneumovax precautions and warnings, including important issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Polyethylene Glycol and Bisacodyl Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl is a laxative used before colonoscopies. This article briefly describes polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl, and provides a link to more information.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Bisacodyl
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl is prescribed to prep the bowels for a colonoscopy. This eMedTV Web page further describes this laxative, with details on how it works, when and how to take it, safety precautions, and more.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Bisacodyl Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl dosage before having a colonoscopy is one bisacodyl tablet and two liters of the solution. This page also offers helpful tips on taking this laxative.
  • Pramipexole ER
    Available by prescription, pramipexole ER is a drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this medication, including information on how it works, tips for when and how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Pramipexole ER Dosage
    When using pramipexole ER for Parkinson's disease, your dosage will be based on several factors. This eMedTV page describes the recommended starting amount for pramipexole ER, and outlines some tips for when and how to take this medicine.
  • Pramipexole ER Drug Information
    Pramipexole ER is a prescription medicine used to treat Parkinson's disease. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on pramipexole ER, explaining the drug's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Aflibercept
    If you have an eye infection or certain allergies, you may not be able to receive aflibercept injections. This eMedTV segment describes important precautions and safety warnings associated with aflibercept, including why it is not safe for some people.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Alendronate
    You should not take alendronate if you cannot sit or stand upright for 30 minutes. This selection from the eMedTV library provides several precautions and warnings with alendronate, including what to discuss with your doctor prior to taking it.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Alendronate and Cholecalciferol
    Alendronate and cholecalciferol may cause extreme muscle or bone pain. This eMedTV page offers other precautions and warnings with alendronate and cholecalciferol, including a more complete list of possible side effects that may occur with the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Alendronate Effervescent Tablet
    A serious bone condition may occur in some people who use alendronate effervescent tablets. This eMedTV page contains more details on precautions and warnings with alendronate effervescent tablets, including information on who should not take the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Betaxolol
    Betaxolol can worsen asthma, heart failure, and certain other conditions. This eMedTV article provides other precautions and warnings with betaxolol and includes a list of certain people who should not use this particular beta blocker medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Calcitonin Salmon Nasal Spray
    You should not use calcitonin salmon nasal spray if you have low blood calcium. This eMedTV Web page provides other precautions and warnings with calcitonin salmon nasal spray to be aware of and offers information on who should not take the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Capsaicin 8% Patch
    Capsaicin 8% patch can raise blood pressure, possibly causing problems for people with certain conditions. This eMedTV Web article offers more precautions and warnings for capsaicin 8% patch, including information on who should not use this drug.
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