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Drug Interactions With Raloxifene - Ibandronate Dosing

This page contains links to eMedTV Senior Health Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Raloxifene to Ibandronate Dosing. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Drug Interactions With Raloxifene
    Drug interactions with raloxifene can occur if it's combined with warfarin and diazepam, among other things. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that can cause interactions, describes the potentially negative results, and explains how to avoid them.
  • Drug Interactions With Risedronate Delayed-Release
    Several drugs can interact with risedronate delayed-release, such as H2 blockers and PPIs. This page of the eMedTV library provides a lengthy list of medicines that can interfere with risedronate delayed-release and the problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Rivastigmine
    Anticholinergic medicines, NSAIDs, and cholinergic drugs could potentially interact with rivastigmine. As this eMedTV page explains, these drug interactions with rivastigmine may lead to side effects or reduce the effectiveness of the medicines.
  • Drug Interactions With Ropinirole XL
    Some drug interactions with ropinirole XL can increase your risk of side effects or other problems. This eMedTV page lists the medications that can negatively interact with ropinirole XL and describes the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Solifenacin Succinate
    Protease inhibitors, QT-prolonging medications, and pramlintide may interact with solifenacin succinate. This eMedTV resource lists other medicines that may cause drug interactions with solifenacin succinate and describes the possible effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Tacrine
    Anticholinergic and cholinergic medications could potentially cause drug interactions with tacrine. As this eMedTV resource explains, tacrine drug interactions can increase your risk for side effects or reduce the effectiveness of the medicines.
  • Drug Interactions With Tazarotene
    As this eMedTV article explains, tazarotene can interact with several drugs, including certain types of antibiotics and diuretics. This page offers a list of other drugs that can interfere with tazarotene and explains how to reduce your risk of problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Teriparatide
    Bisphosphonates and digoxin may cause drug interactions with teriparatide. This eMedTV resource lists the specific bisphosphonate and digoxin products that may cause interactions and describes the possible effects of combining these drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With Testosterone Gel
    Certain medicines, such as warfarin or insulin, can cause testosterone gel drug interactions. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may negatively interact with testosterone gel and describes the complications that may occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Testosterone Pellets
    Combining warfarin, prednisone, or insulin with testosterone pellets may cause complications. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at the potential interactions that may occur if you use testosterone pellets in combination with certain drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With the Nitroglycerin Patch
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions can occur when the nitroglycerin patch is combined with rosiglitazone, alcohol, or a number of other drugs. This page lists other products that may cause problems and describes the problems that may result.
  • Drug Interactions With the Shingles Vaccine
    Immunosuppressants, immune globulins, and other vaccines may interact with the shingles vaccine. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that may cause drug interactions with the shingles vaccine and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Tobramycin and Dexamethasone
    There are currently no known drug interactions with tobramycin and dexamethasone. However, as this eMedTV page explains, there may be interactions that haven't been discovered yet. Therefore, make sure your doctor is aware of all your medications.
  • Drug Interactions With Tofacitinib
    Live vaccines, prednisone, and certain other drugs can interact with tofacitinib. This eMedTV segment provides a list of other products that can react negatively with this prescription medicine and explains how you can reduce your risk of problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Tolterodine
    Vinblastine, protease inhibitors, and pramlintide may cause drug interactions with tolterodine. This eMedTV article explains what may happen with these dug interactions and lists other medicines that can cause a negative interaction.
  • Drug Interactions With Tolterodine ER
    Vinblastine, cyclosporine, and protease inhibitors can cause drug interactions with tolterodine ER. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may interact with tolterodine ER and explains what can happen when these drugs are taken together.
  • Drug Interactions With Trospium
    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, pramlintide, and anticholinergic drugs may interact with trospium. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at the potentially negative consequences of these drug interactions with trospium.
  • Drug Interactions With Trospium XR
    This eMedTV page explains that alcohol, anticholinergic medicines, and pramlintide are among the drugs that may interact with trospium XR. This page explores other possible drug interactions with trospium XR and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Etidronate
    Etidronate is a medication that is licensed to treat heterotopic ossification and Paget's disease. This eMedTV segment discusses etidronate uses in more detail, describes how the drug works, and explains how and when to take the medicine.
  • Etidronate Dosing
    Etidronate dosing for the treatment of Paget's disease usually starts at 5 mg per kg (of weight) once daily. This eMedTV segment also lists dosing recommendations for heterotopic ossification caused by spinal cord injury or hip replacement surgery.
  • Etidronate Drug Information
    If you are looking for information on etidronate, this eMedTV article is a great place to start. This resource talks about what the drug is prescribed for, safety precautions, and dosing, with a link to learn more.
  • Exercise for Seniors
    Moderate physical activity for 30 minutes a day can ensure good health in older adults. This eMedTV page talks more about seniors and exercise, including lists of activities that can help older adults be more active, as well as safety tips.
  • Extended-Release Gabapentin
    Extended-release gabapentin is a prescription drug used to treat nerve pain following a case of shingles. This eMedTV Web selection describes how this medication works, explains when and how to take it, and lists possible side effects.
  • Extended-Release Gabapentin Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the dosage of extended-release gabapentin your doctor prescribes will be based on how well your kidneys function. This page outlines specific dosing guidelines for this drug and offers some precautions for taking it.
  • Febuxostat
    Febuxostat is a prescription medicine licensed for the prevention of gout attacks. This eMedTV Web segment explains what you should know before taking this medication, describes the effects of the drug, and offers general dosing information.
  • Febuxostat Dosage
    When using febuxostat for preventing gout attacks, the recommended starting dosage is 40 mg once daily. This eMedTV page contains more detailed information on how your doctor will determine your dosage of febuxostat, as well as tips for taking this drug.
  • Febuxostat Drug Information
    Looking for information on febuxostat? This eMedTV resource provides a brief look at this drug. It explains its limitations as a treatment for gout, how it works, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking this medication.
  • Fesoterodine
    Fesoterodine is a prescription medicine approved for treating symptoms of an overactive bladder. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of this drug, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Fesoterodine Dosage
    The recommended fesoterodine dosage for treating an overactive bladder is 4 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page explains how dosing works for people with severe kidney problems and includes tips for taking this medication.
  • Fesoterodine Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides some basic information on fesoterodine, a drug used to treat an overactive bladder. This article offers details on how to take it, what to expect, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Fluocinonide Gel
    Fluocinonide gel is prescribed to treat dermatitis, eczema, and various other skin conditions. This eMedTV resource explains in detail how this medicated skin gel works, offers general dosing information, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Fluocinonide Gel Dosage
    The standard dose of fluocinonide gel is a small amount that is applied two to four times daily. This eMedTV page describes some of the factors that may affect your dosage and offers some helpful tips for applying this prescription medicine.
  • Fluocinonide Gel Information
    Fluocinonide gel is a drug that is available by prescription and used for treating various skin conditions. This eMedTV Web selection offers more information on fluocinonide gel, including how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Fluocinonide Gel Side Effects
    Contact your doctor if you are using fluocinonide gel and you develop infections or hallucinations. This eMedTV Web selection contains a list of other possible reactions, including some of the possible long-term side effects this medicine may cause.
  • Forteo (Teriparatide) for Osteoporosis
    If you have osteoporosis, your healthcare provider may prescribe teriparatide (Forteo). This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at using this medication to build new bone. This article also includes a link to learn more.
  • Gabapentin ER Drug Information
    This eMedTV article discusses important drug information on extended-release (ER) gabapentin, including why this medicine may not be suitable for some people, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines. A link to more details is also included.
  • Galantamine
    Galantamine is a drug used for treating mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. This eMedTV resource provides general dosing information for galantamine, explains how the drug works, and describes its effects.
  • Galantamine Dosing
    The recommended starting dosage for long-acting galantamine is 8 mg once daily. This article from the eMedTV archives also offers galantamine dosing guidelines for the short-acting form and explains how often your doctor may increase your dosage.
  • Galantamine Hydrobromide Information
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, if you have Alzheimer's disease, galantamine may be prescribed to slow down dementia symptoms. This article provides some basic drug information on galantamine hydrobromide.
  • Generic Androderm
    There are currently no generic Androderm (testosterone patch) products available. This page of the eMedTV Web site addresses why no company is making a generic version and discusses the risks of buying a generic version from another country.
  • Generic Colcrys
    There is currently no generic Colcrys (colchicine) available. However, as this eMedTV page explains, you can buy older colchicine products that are not approved by the FDA, but they technically cannot be considered generic versions of the drug.
  • Generic Cutivate Ointment
    As this eMedTV article explains, Cutivate Ointment (fluticasone propionate ointment) is available in generic form. This page discusses how those versions compare to the brand-name form and describes situations when a larger or smaller tube may be better.
  • Generic Delatestryl
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Delatestryl (testosterone enanthate) is currently available, and it is one of the most affordable testosterone replacement products around. This article offers more details on the generic version of this drug.
  • Generic Depo-Testosterone
    You can buy generic Depo-Testosterone (testosterone cypionate) in two different strengths. This eMedTV Web selection lists several manufacturers of these generic medications and explains whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Locoid Lipocream
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Locoid Lipocream (hydrocortisone butyrate) is not yet available in generic form. This article discusses when this situation might change and explains what the term "generic name" means.
  • Generic Menomune
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Menomune (meningococcal vaccine) is not available in generic form. This article discusses why this is so, with information on whether the regulations surrounding brand-name Menomune are likely to change.
  • Generic Miacalcin Injection
    Miacalcin injection is not currently available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV Web site discusses possible reasons why no drug companies have chosen to manufacture generic Miacalcin injection.
  • Generic Pneumovax
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine). This eMedTV resource sheds more light on why no generic versions of this vaccine exist. The approval process for "biologic" medications is also discussed.
  • Generic Zyloprim
    Zyloprim (allopurinol) is available in generic form. This eMedTV page explains how the FDA has determined that generic Zyloprim is equivalent to the brand-name drug. This page also lists the available strengths and manufacturers of this generic drug.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Loose Body Removal)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Ginco
    As a "natural" herbal supplement, ginkgo may be used for several purposes, such as improving memory. This eMedTV page describes some of the possible side effects of ginkgo and covers some general precautions. Ginco is a common misspelling of ginkgo.
  • Gingkgo
    Many people use ginkgo supplements to help improve memory and mental functioning. This eMedTV article briefly covers the effects of ginkgo and offers general warnings and precautions for this supplement. Gingkgo is a common misspelling of ginkgo.
  • Gingko
    Ginkgo is a supplement that supposedly helps improve memory and "thins" the blood, among other things. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at ginkgo and provides a link to more detailed information. Gingko is a common misspelling of ginkgo.
  • Ginkgo
    Ginkgo is an herbal supplement that is claimed to improve memory and help with several other conditions. This eMedTV article describes the benefits of ginkgo, lists side effects that may occur, and explains the effectiveness of this herbal remedy.
  • Ginkgo Benefits
    Ginkgo supplements may be beneficial for people with depression, dementia, or glaucoma. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes other potential ginkgo benefits, explains how this supplement works, and discusses its use in children.
  • Ginkgo Dosage
    An effective and safe ginkgo dosage has not been established at this time. This portion of the eMedTV library provides the ginkgo doses that were used in clinical studies and offers tips for finding a trustworthy manufacturer for ginkgo supplements.
  • Ginkgo Supplement Information
    This eMedTV page offers some basic information on ginkgo, a supplement commonly used to help people improve their memory. Ginkgo supplements are not without risks, however, so safety information is also included in this article.
  • Ginko
    As an herbal supplement, ginkgo may have several benefits, such as improving mental functioning. This eMedTV Web article explores other ginkgo benefits and lists some of its potential side effects. Ginko is a common misspelling of ginkgo.
  • Glaucosamine Chondroitin
    Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements are often used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV article describes the effects of this product and lists its potential side effects. Glaucosamine chondroitin is a common misspelling of glucosamine and chondroitin.
  • Glucosamene Sulfate
    Glucosamine sulfate is a dietary supplement claimed to be useful for treating arthritis. This eMedTV segment describes how it works and offers general warnings for the product. Glucosamene sulfate is a common misspelling of glucosamine sulfate.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin
    Glucosamine and chondroitin is a dietary supplement commonly used for treating arthritis. This eMedTV Web page explains how it works, offers dosing information for the product, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Dosage
    General glucosamine and chondroitin dosage recommendations are available for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV page covers the doses that were used in clinical trials and offers tips for finding a reliable manufacturer.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Supplements
    This eMedTV article explains how glucosamine and chondroitin supplements are used to treat arthritis symptoms. Side effects and safety warnings are also discussed, and a link to more detailed information is provided.
  • Glucosamine Condroitin
    Glucosamine and chondroitin is a supplement claimed to be useful for treating arthritis. This eMedTV resource explains how this "natural" product may work for arthritis. Glucosamine condroitin is a common misspelling of glucosamine and chondroitin.
  • Glucosamine Sulfate
    Glucosamine sulfate is a supplement most often used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV Web page explains how glucosamine sulfate works, explores the safety and effectiveness of the supplement, and lists potential side effects of the product.
  • Glucosamine Sulphate
    Glucosamine sulfate is a supplement primarily used for treating osteoarthritis. This eMedTV page describes how the product works and lists some of its potential side effects. Glucosamine sulphate is a common misspelling of glucosamine sulfate.
  • Glucosemine Chondroitin
    Glucosamine and chondroitin is a dietary supplement used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this product. Glucosemine chondroitin is a common misspelling of glucosamine and chondroitin.
  • Glucosomine Chondriton
    Glucosamine and chondroitin is often used for treating arthritis. This eMedTV page describes the effects of this product and explains what to be aware of before taking it. Glucosomine chondriton is a common misspelling of glucosamine and chondroitin.
  • Glucosomine Chondroitin
    Glucosamine and chondroitin is a supplement often used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV segment offers general warnings for this product and explains how it may work. Glucosomine chondroitin is a common misspelling of glucosamine and chondroitin.
  • Headaches and Nitroglycerin Patch
    The most commonly reported side effect of the nitroglycerin patch is headaches. This page of the eMedTV Web site further discusses this potential side effect and provides a link to more detailed information on possible reactions to this drug.
  • How a Healthy Knee Works
    The knee is a joint that allows for the motion of your leg, by bending and extending. This video clip covers how a healthy knee works.
  • How Do Beta Blockers Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, beta blockers work in a variety of different ways to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This article further discusses how beta blockers work, including the various affects on the body.
  • How Does Nitroglycerin Work?
    By relaxing the arteries and veins in the body, nitroglycerin can help treat or prevent angina. This eMedTV page further explores how nitroglycerin works to improve blood flow and oxygen supply to the heart. A link to more details is also provided.
  • How Safe Is Knee Arthroscopy (for Loose Bodies)?
    This video clip addresses safety concerns regarding knee arthroscopy.
  • How to Use Testosterone Enanthate
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains how to use testosterone enanthate, including where and how often the injections are given. This article also provides a link to more in-depth information on the drug's dosing guidelines.
  • Hylan G-F 20
    Hylan G-F 20 is a viscosupplement approved for treating osteoarthritis of the knee. This eMedTV resource describes how this arthritis treatment works, outlines its benefits, and explains how (and how often) this product is administered.
  • Hylan G-F 20 Dosage
    Your dose of hylan G-F 20 will be given as either a single injection or a series of three injections. This eMedTV segment offers more dosing information, including an explanation of how your doctor will administer the hylan G-F 20 injections.
  • Hylan G-F 20 Drug Information
    Hylan G-F 20 is a gel-like liquid that is injected directly into the knee joint. This part of the eMedTV site gives an overview of Hylan G-F 20, with information on how often it is given and what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment.
  • Ibandronate
    Ibandronate is a medicine that is prescribed to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV resource describes in detail how the drug works, explains when and how it should be taken, and lists possible side effects.
  • Ibandronate Dosing
    For monthly treatment with ibandronate, dosing usually starts at 150 mg. This article from the eMedTV Web site also offers dosage recommendations for the injectable form of ibandronate.
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