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What Are Diclofenac Eye Drops Used For?

Postoperative inflammation after cataract surgery and eye pain and sensitivity to light after corneal refraction surgery can be managed with diclofenac eye drops. On occasion, healthcare providers may recommend off-label diclofenac eye drops uses, such as the treatment of eye pain or inflammation due to other causes. This medication is not currently approved for children.

Diclofenac Eye Drops Uses: An Overview

Diclofenac eye drops (Voltaren Ophthalmic®) are a prescription medication used for certain eye surgeries. Specifically, this medication is approved for treating:
 
  • Postoperative inflammation in people who have had cataract surgery
  • Pain and sensitivity to light in people undergoing corneal refraction surgery (such as LASIK surgery).
     
Although steroid eye drops, like prednisolone, are often used for similar purposes -- that is, treating inflammation due to eye surgery -- NSAID eye drops like diclofenac are generally less likely to cause serious side effects such as cataracts and increased eye pressure.
 

How Do Diclofenac Eye Drops Work?

Diclofenac eye drops belong to a group of medications called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Like other NSAIDs, the medicine works by blocking a specific enzyme known as cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and by blocking the production of various inflammatory substances in the body.
 

Using Diclofenac Eye Drops in Children

This drug is not approved for use in children. Talk with your child's healthcare provider about the benefits and risks of using diclofenac eye drops in children.
 

Are Diclofenac Eye Drops Used for Off-Label Uses?

On occasion, your healthcare provider may recommend this medication for something other than the uses discussed in this article. At this time, using diclofenac eye drops to treat eye pain or inflammation due to any other cause would be considered an off-label use. For example, using this drug to treat eye pain and inflammation due to corneal abrasion would be an off-label indication.
 
The Dirty, Messy Part of BPH

Diclofenac Eye Drop Information

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